Parents Program

Navigating stressful times

By CSU Media | October 28, 2020

Adjusting to college can be stressful, and adding COVID-19 to the mix has made the adjustment even more challenging. Navigating a global pandemic has emphasized one thing – we are all in this together. Every university student, faculty member, and administrator at every university is struggling with the same challenges. Take comfort that you are not alone!

We’re all suffering burnout – students, professors, parents. But, hang in there – since we didn’t take breaks, there are only 27 days until the end of the semester. Waiting on the other side is turkey, long naps, family fun, and celebrating the birth of our Savior. 

We’ve created a short list to help you and your students finish the semester strong, or as President Dondi Costin likes to say, “survive and advance.” 

Academics
Studying in high school and college are very different. Students who are struggling academically should reach out to their professors, their academic advisor, the Learning Center, the Student Success Center, the Writing Center, and the Math Center. 

Students might have studied a couple of hours a week in high school. It’s suggested that students spend two hours outside of class studying for every hour they are in class.

Resilience, aka Grit
According to the organization Choose Well, “Resilience means having the grit to get through tough times.” At mychoosewell.com they encourage:

  • “Mastering your emotions”
  • “Reframe stressful thoughts”
  • “Keep track of your successes”

God’s Word says it like this in 2 Corinthians 10:5, “We demolish arguments and every pretension that sets itself up against the knowledge of God, and we take captive every thought to make it obedient to Christ.” 

Some practical things you can do with your students include setting up Zoom or FaceTime calls with family and friends, send written notes of encouragement, text Bible verses and funny memes, encourage them to get out and take a walk on campus each day and invite someone to go with them, talk to them about building resilient habits, and pray continually. 

If your student needs to talk to a compassionate professional, the CSU Counseling Center is available on the first floor of the Student Center. And check out some of the resources on the Counseling Center’s web page about anxiety and depression.


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